Advent Devotions, Week Three

Sunday, December 17 Hark the Herald Angels Sing from A Charlie Brown Christmas

Sometimes the most beautiful song comes from the mouths of children. They don’t always remember the words perfectly; they don’t always sing exactly on key. What matters to them is that they are doing something they enjoy, and that we celebrate with them in whatever they can offer. The Christmas story in particular puts children at the center: a teenage mother, shepherds young enough to sleep in the fields, angels of all kinds come to sing praises, and of course, a child born in a manger. Join us for worship at 10am for our annual youth Christmas program on this third Sunday of Advent, and light your third candle today!


Monday, December 18Do You Hear What I Hear? by Whitney Houston

The good news of Christ’s birth is passed on in many ways. Some of us learned it from storybooks as children; some of us came to understand its meaning and power as adults. It can be told in plays, musicals, poetry, and prose, but no matter how it comes to us, it is always a moment of one person saying to another: I have something to share with you. Who do you call when you have good news to share?


Tuesday, December 19He Made a Way in a Manger by Vicky Beeching

Christmas is not the end of God’s amazing work among us. Jesus’ teaching, death, and resurrection make the story complete. God was willing to become flesh, knowing that it would lead to death on the cross, and trusting in the promise of resurrection. In Jesus’ birth, death, and resurrection, God declares there is no where that humanity can be, no depth that we can find, that God cannot meet us in. God is always seeking a way to be with us, even today.


Wednesday, December 20The Christmas Song by the Dave Matthews Band

Christmas is not the end of the impossibilities that are possible with God. As an adult, Jesus took drinkers, fishermen, tax collectors, and women of ill repute as followers and disciples. On the night of his betrayal he offered bread and wine to his friends promising that it would be a sign that his body was given for them. God took on flesh and, when faced with violence and hate, accepted the wounds of the world and died. But perhaps the greatest miracle of all is that God, source and ground of Love, came into a world that responded to that love with hate — and responded, and responds still, with even more love.


Thursday, December 21I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day by Burl Ives

“I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day” first appeared in publication in 1865, written by the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Facing a Christmas without his recently deceased wife and his son who had enlisted in the Civil War, Longfellow surely didn’t feel much like celebrating. It felt like the world was being torn apart at the seams; how could the bells of Christmas keep ringing? Yet the poet imagined he heard the bells repeating the angels’ song: “Peace on earth, goodwill to men!” What will give you hope today?


Friday, December 22Open Up by The Brilliance

In this song we hear the words of Saint Francis of Assisi, who wrote the prayer “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace.” The work of Christmas isn’t just God’s work. God invites us into the work too: offering hope where there is pain, light where there is darkness, love where there is hate. God comes to us not to keep us in reverence at the manger but to send us out to those who are in need. What do you have today that can help a hurting world?


Saturday, December 23God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen by Nat King Cole

This is one of the oldest still-sung Christmas carols, dating back to the sixteenth century; it is quoted in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. Although it may sound like the song is asking for God to give merry gentlemen some rest, “God rest ye merry” is an old-timey way of saying “may God keep you merry.” What is making you merry and joyful? What is your favorite part of the Christmas season, and how can you find just a little more of it today?